SALTWATER WASTE DISPOSAL - Understanding the Process

In an effort to sort through the facts and myths of , this blog post is dedicated to understanding the process of SWD from the definition, process, description of construction and facility and what the future of SWD looks like in this thriving industry. In fact, the progress made in the last ten years on cleaning up waste across the oil and gas industry is changing the business and the outlook on the future in the oil and gas industry.

UNDERSTANDING A SALTWATER DISPOSAL WELL & THE PROCESS

Deposits of oil and natural gas can be found in porous rocks and shale, where saltwater is also found. The handling of the saltwater, or produced water, which brings the oil and gas up to the surface, can be done in different ways.

Salt Water Waste Disposal (SWD) well is a disposal site for water collected as a byproduct of oil and gas production. Quite often when oil and gas are pumped out of the earth, they aren't pure enough for distribution. “Saltwater” is considered hazardous because of its high salt content, hydrocarbons and industrial compounds.  Companies have the choice to recycle the water or inject the waste water back into working reservoirs for reuse in gathering any remaining oil or gas, or they can discard it at a salt water well disposal site.”

In certain situations, some of it can be recycled. Secondly, in the case of conventional reservoirs, it can be returned to the reservoir through fluid injection. Thirdly, as the Railroad Commission of Texas (http://www.rrc.state.tx.us/) explains, it can be “Injected into underground porous rock formations not productive of oil or gas, and sealed above and below by unbroken, impermeable strata.” This last method is predominantly used by saltwater disposal wells to manage the saltwater, also referred to as oilfield brine.

The Environmental Protection Agency (https://www.epa.gov) describes a saltwater disposal well as a “bored, drilled or driven shaft whose depth is greater than the largest surface dimension,” and categorizes all saltwater disposal wells into six separate classes based on their construction and their operating features. 
 

SALTWATER DISPOSAL CONSTRUCTION & WHAT A FACILITY LOOKS LIKE

A Class II SWD system is an injection well in combination with tanks, piping, skim tanks, pumps which receive salt/production water from the drilling process and allows the water to be injected into isolated formations. All done in accordance to EPA and State requirements. SWD are typically owned and operated by Oil and Gas Companies, Midstream Service Companies, and Commercial Operators.  There are over 144,000 Class II wells in the United States.

WHAT IS THE FUTURE?

The market for SWD’s will continue to be strong, albeit oil and natural gas pricing can moderate it a bit.  The Permian Basin has over 722 million barrels of proven reserves alone.  At the present there are over 480 drilling rigs operating in the Permian Basin.  The need for SWD wells is essential in handling the disposal waste at these sites and the technology to advance with the ever-changing and advancing industry.  MBA Energy and Industrial has put together an efficient and cost-effective way to handle the Salt Water with its Oil Bandit Systems.  By using the latest technology on tankage and pumps along with a control system, SWD's can be operated around the clock with minimal supervision. MBA's control system can notify operators on their phones at any location if there are any upsets in the process that they need to be aware of.  Plus, the reduced footprint has allowed MBA to decrease the cost of SWD construction

Cory Martin, Business Principal for MBA Energy and Industrial said, “The SWD market is definitely a strong one in the Permian Basin and other oil and gas strong-holds in the U.S. MBA Energy and Industrial is proud to be part of this thriving industry and part of the efforts to keep the sites clean and in standard with the protections set forth by the EPA. We look forward to continued growth and advancement in the industry and working with our customers in developing systems that work for their specific needs.”

 

FEEL FREE TO SHARE THIS BLOG POST AND REACH OUT FOR MORE DETAILS ON SALTWATER WASTE DISPOSAL (SWD) AND OILBANDIT SYSTEMS ON OUR WEBSITE AT WWW.MBA-NRG.COMsales@mba-nrg.com, www. MBA-NRG.COM, (832) 299-4844

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